Passage to and the town of Bar Harbor 7_22 to 7_25

It is hard to believe it has been so long since we have updated the Blog. We started this post a few weeks ago and then got so busy  doing some local travel that we never got around to publishing it.  So anyway, here it is. 

After sending the last update, we headed back to the boat in a sea of fog. A new entrant to the harbor awaited and gave us a bit of a start.

Spooky ship in Rockland Harbor

Spooky ship in Rockland Harbor – reminded us of Pirates of the Caribbean

We decided to take the coastal route north to Bar Harbor. While the views along the way were breathtaking it was stressful passage trying to avoid all the lobster buoys. We did catch a few, however we were under sail so they only hung on to the keel for a short bit.

We passed by the town of Northeast - picturesque little town

We passed by the town of Northeast – picturesque little town

Buoys so thick you could almost walk on them

Buoys so thick you could almost walk on them

Typical house along the way - tucked into the hills

Typical house along the way – tucked into the hills

Bar Harbor pronounced by the locals is Baaahh Haarber.  A destination spot for many for its own attractiveness along with being the gateway to Acadia National Park. Our first day in town, we took a tour on the local Olie’s Trolly to Cadillac Mountain – the highest point in the park. The tour operator was extremely well informed and shared stories of the park’s history. The park’s existence can in large part be credited to  Rockefeller family who donated quite a bit of the land. In fact, when David Rockefeller turned 100 this past June he donated another 1000 acres of land AND then took his horse and buggy out of a ride along the carriage roads.

View from the top of Cadillac Mountain - our boat is actually in the picture!

View from the top of Cadillac Mountain – see the white spots at near the water? One is our boat!

The park edges are lined with 37,000 stones which were paid for by Rockefeller

The park edges are lined with 37,000 stones which were paid for by Rockefeller

The windblown duo at the top of the mountain

The windblown duo at the top of the mountain

We made three trips into the park, one on a trolley, one on the local bus, and one we biked in from town. Here are a few other shots of the park and the town of Bar Harbor.

Beaver dam in the park

Beaver dam in the park

Thunder hole in Acardia

Thunder hole in Acadia

Waterfront and downtown Bar harbor

Waterfront and downtown Bar harbor

Agamont Park so beautiful right on the water

Agamont Park so beautiful right on the water

We are heading home next week (8/20) so before we do our final sign off we’ll send along a few interesting pictures of sites in Maine.  Until then…

Sunset with the Bar Harbor Inn in the background

Sunset with the Bar Harbor Inn in the background

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Great Diamond Island_Boothbay Harbor_Rockland 7_16 to 7_20

About an hour sail from Portland is a quaint little island called Great Diamond Island. On the island is a development called Diamond Cove which is comprised of renovated military housing built in the early 1900’s. It was used as a military base through WWII and was a prime spot  for the military to assemble conveys to go to Europe. The island is only accessible by boat and they have ferry service to both ends of the island (this is important to note) on a daily basis. There are few roads and only a couple of cars on the island, transportation is primarily by golf cart and bicycle.

Diamond Cove - this house was originally a hospital

Diamond Cove – this house was originally a hospital

Fort converted to a house. Seems it would be a bit dark inside.

Fort converted to a house. Seems it would be a bit dark inside.

Remember we mentioned the community of Diamond Cove? It is a well planned out high end community. On the OTHER end of the island is where locals have been living for decades. Interestingly, there is actually a fence that separates one side from the other preventing you from going by golf cart. We were able to walk to the other side of the island where we met a local named Richard Harris. He and his family have had a summer home there for 40 years. He took all around on his side of the island pointing out interesting tidbits about his neighbors who include a physicist from Harvard among the group. We got the impression he was trying to show us his side of the island was as good as the other. We think it is better!

Richard Harris and dog Gracie

Richard Harris and dog Gracie

Clubhouse on the OTHER side

Clubhouse on the OTHER side

Our next stop was Boothbay Harbor, a 34 Nautical miles from Diamond Cove. Boothbay Harbor has undergone renovation in the past few years so most of building are new – all in the typical New England style. More than other stops along the way, Boothbay has a touristy feel to it. The view from the boat is amazing though.

Boothbay Harbor - downtown

Boothbay Harbor – downtown

Boothbay harbor view from boat

Boothbay harbor view from boat

There are a number of lobster boats working out of this harbor. The lobster industry in Maine accounts for 80% of all the lobsters in the United States. The waters up here are showered with lobster bouys making navigation tricky especially in the fog. The last thing you want is the lobster pot line entangled in your prop. As the lobster boats head towards the harbor they are surrounded by seagulls anxious to feed on any remaining bait. There is a tradition up here that when a lobster man dies they have trained seagulls to fly around the funeral. There is a man up here who trained them and charges $3.00 per gull. Amazing how people make money.

Boothbay Harbor lobster boat

Boothbay Harbor lobster boat

Boothbay Harbor lobster pot

Boothbay Harbor lobster pot

Our voyage from Boothbay Harbor to Rockland tested the Captain’s nerves and the first mate’s eyes. This passage was through a narrow channel sprouting huge rocks everywhere and heavily populated with lobster bouys – to add to the “excitement” we where engulfed in very heavy fog. It is so spooky to all of the sudden see a boat appear from the fog! What a relief when we finally moored in the Rockland Harbor Saturday night.

Rockland is best known for the Farnsworth Museum housing the works of the N.C., Andrew, and Jaime Wyeth – Grandfather, father and son. The museum though small has many of their works along with other American artists. It is incredible the talent held in three generations of Wyeths.

Rockland Farnsworth museum

Rockland Farnsworth museum

NC Wyeth painting

NC Wyeth painting

Unlike Boothbay, the downtown of Rockland has remained the same for years. One feels they have taken a trip back in time strolling down main street surrounded by brick buildings.

Rockland Downtown

Rockland Downtown – see the fog?

The fog is taking some getting used to for Mindy. It is can be all clear and then all of the sudden – poof – you can’t see in down the street!

Rockland Harbor - fog rolling in

Rockland Harbor – fog rolling in

We are heading out tomorrow (fog willing) to our final stop in Bar Harbor. It will be a three day trip as we will stay close to shore and stop every night. Our auto pilot is broken and steering all day is tiring. Until then….

Rockland Harbor - sunset

Rockland Harbor – sunset

Passage to Portland and South Freeport 7_7 to 7_15

The passage to Portland was running along so well we had to actually slow it down to ensure we did not get into Portland in the dark. We sailed most of it wing on wing (the jib sail on one side and the main on the other) to catch the maximum wind available. The whale sightings this trip were two Minke whales. These are smaller whales that somewhat resemble a shark given the position of their dorsal fin.

Minke whale

Minke whale – From internet – for those that thought we took this – lol

Another interesting sighting on the passage was a tuna boat. See they guys at the top of the boat? Well, they are the lookouts searching the waters for tuna. Once spotted, the harpooner heads to the bow to throw the harpoon in hopes of catching this high valued fish.

Tuna boat

Tuna boat – those are people at the top of the boat

Twenty-six hours from our departure we entered the Portland harbor. The fog distorted our view of the famous lighthouse so we took the liberty of letting google show the image.

Portland Lighthouse

Portland Lighthouse

The best way to describe Portland is a city with a small town feel.  Given this is tourist season (still trying to get used to the summer being season) the streets and restaurants are bustling with the new entrants sightseeing and locals enjoying the amazing weather.  We haven’t done any of the tourist attractions here, but have been enjoying a few of their MANY restaurants. The waterfront is peppered with every type of food service you can image from Sushi to local craft brew pubs.

Flatbread Company - on the wharf

Flatbread Company – on the wharf – great food.

Of course this being Maine, we have been sampling the local lobster rolls. The best so far has been the one at this little seafood shack.

3 Bouys Seafood

3 Bouys Seafood

We took a side trip up to South Freeport to venture into retail land with a trip to the L.L Bean store.

LL Bean shopping day

LL Bean shopping day – this store has 3 million visitors per year.

Downtown Freeport is basically two streets comprised of various retail outlets including Talbots, J.Crew, Coach, etc. Like any outlet store you have to look for the bargains. We did find a few.

Once outside of the downtown, the residential area is delightful. In the early 1900’s there was a castle here that was used as a hotel. The only remaining remnant is the tower.

Castle in South Freeprt

Castle in South Freeport

Typical home in South Freeport

Typical home in South Freeport

South Freeport Waterfront

South Freeport Waterfront

Tomorrow we are heading out to do some coastal sailing and explore a few of  the many islands. Until then….

Portland_Ending quote

Woods Hole, Cape Cod Canal and P-Town 7_2 to 7_6

There are two ways to get to P-town from Nantucket. One is to go around the cape and the other is to back track through Woods Hole then through the Cape Cod Canal. Because of shifting sandbars, there have been 77 rescues in the past 10 years of those choosing to go around the cape – we opted for the back track. Even this is not an easy passage. Woods Hole is notorious for its treachery as the channel is surrounded by rocks hungry for fiberglass. We were fortunate to have a clear day and to have the current in our favor. Take a look at this buoy to get an idea of how strong current flows.

Woods hole current

Woods hole current – buoy being pulled by current 

After making it through Woods Hole we tucked into Onset, MA picked up a mooring and spent the night. The second part of the passage was through the Cape Cod canal providing an opportunity to experience the uniqueness of the the Cape. The canal is lined with large boulder like stones on either side which are speckled with fishermen.

Cape Cod Fishermen

Cape Cod Fishermen

Cape Cod canal

Cape Cod canal

Early afternoon on the 4th of July we hit P-Town.  Wow – it is unique. If you have ever been to Key West, Miami Beach or Wilton Manors you have experienced a bit of the freedom of P-town. We do emphasize A BIT. Not unlike the other ports on our voyage the architecture is New England style cottage cute but with a sprucing of over the top ( maybe you could call it flair) here and there. Flags are big here….especially those with multiple colors…

Flags seen everywhere

Flags seen everywhere

P-Town Main Street

P-Town Main Street

Mindy came across this house and found out from the owner the pieces of “art” had been brought in from all over the world. Remember, flair?

Art work house in P-town

Art work house in P-town

There is a level of politeness you don’t see anywhere else. Instead of saying the harsh no vacancy…try..

Sorry sign instead of no vacancy

Sorry sign instead of no vacancy

We must admit the fireworks were phenomenal and it was during the fireworks when they had a huge bursting of multiple fireworks leading you to believe it was over and then they started again that we heard these true words from the next boat over – “Well, in P-town everything is a little different “.

Nantucket 6_30 to 7_2

The original inhabitants of Nantucket were the Wampanoag Indians and according to their legend Nantucket was formed by a great giant named Maushop. One night as he rested on the shore of Cape Cod, Maushop woke up with sand in his moccasins. He kicked one moccasin off, and it flew into the ocean and became Martha’s Vineyard. Maushop tried to sleep again, but his other moccasin was also filled with sand, so he kicked it out even farther into the ocean, it landed and became NANTUCKET island.

What a place –  Nantucket. Starting as a very successful whaling community the island has reinvented itself many times. Today it is the playground of the very wealthy and those of us coming ashore to enjoy all the amenities the town has to offer. We anchored in the harbor which is filled with boats (the most next to Newport). A short dingy ride to the dock and we were at the hub spot of the island – Harbor Basin.  There are shops all along the harbor that offer a variety of goods from very expensive clothing to wine and cheese. Dean had the opportunity to connect with one of his friends that owns one of these shops. She sells sweaters made from Bamboo that sell for oh, about $900 a piece and she sure seems to be doing well. Give you an idea of the money here? It is Palm Beach..New England style. No more millionaire – Billionaires only please…..

Harbor basin shops

Harbor basin shops

There are also Condo and homes along the harbor. The cottages all have names like Zena Cottage, Pisces, etc. A rare combination of a rustic look immaculately kept.

Nantucket condo

Nantucket harbor condos

Nantucket cottage

Nantucket cottage

The town has down a fantastic job of preserving its history with many of the main streets are made of the original cobblestone. Beautiful to look at, hard to walk on.

Main Street with cobblestones

Main Street with cobblestones

While most of stay here has been focused on housekeeping, i.e., doing laundry, grocery shopping, we did take some time out to visit the Whaling Museum. It got top reviews on Trip Adviser and we can attest it is well deserved. They provided incredible insights into the lives of the original whalers along with interesting tales of island. The whalers sought the large sperm whales as they had the best blubber (yes, blubber was a good thing back then). The whaling ships would often be gone for three to five years at a time. Here are a few shots taken at the museum.

Sperm whale carcass - this was not even a full grown whale

Sperm whale carcass – this was not even a full grown whale

Scrimshaw done by whalers - they passed the time with these drawings on whale teeth

Scrimshaw done by whalers – they passed the time with these drawings on whale teeth

The had an very detailed account of the Essex which was the ship that inspired the book  Moby Dick. There is movie coming out in December starring Chris Hemsworth on the whale attack of the Essex and the struggle for the survivors. That Thor is talented!

We are heading to Provincetown next. So until then we leave you with this passage from Moby Dick….

“With the landless gull, that at sunset folds her wings and is rocked to sleep between billows; so at nightfall, the Nantucketer, out of sight of land, furls the sails, and lays him to rest, while under his very pillows herds of walruses and whales”

Elizabeth Islands and Martha’s Vineyard 6_24 to 6-29

We left bright and early Wednesday morning with the winds in our favor.  It was a very good sail from Newport to our first stop in the Elizabeth Islands. In case you have never heard of them the Elizabeth Islands are a chain of small islands extending southwest from the southern coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Most all of the islands in the chain are owned by the Forbes and are private although they do allow anchoring and shores visits in some places. The one island that is not owned by the family is Cuttyhunk. This little town is a real gem. It is 580 acres and has a full time population of about 100. After tying the dingy up we walked up to downtown which consists of a corner market. The “thing to do” in Cuttyhunk is to walk up the hill to see the view. We have to share with you a few town sights before sharing the spectacular view.

The market - only open certain hours

The market – only open certain hours 9-11 and 3-5. Closed Wed and Sun!

Elementary school - we were told 3 students attended

Elementary school – we were told 3 students attended

Cuttyhunk mail truck

Cuttyhunk mail truck

In order to get to the top of the hill you walk up a road with stone wall on either side. This elaborate road was constructed by a Mr. Woods to lead to a house he was building at the top of the hill for his son. Unfortunately, the house was never built, the son died in a car accident. The road stands alone.

Stonewall road built by Mr. Woods

Stonewall road built by Mr. Woods

And now the views..

View from top of hill

View from top of hill

Another view

Another view

Before we headed back to the boat we bought some scrod from the local fisherman selling it at the dock. It was fantastic! You just can’t beat fresh like that.

The next day we headed over to Hadley Harbor. This is owned by the Forbes family, however they let do allow boats in the harbor and actually provide moorings at no cost. It is one of the best protected harbors so when we heard of bad weather heading our way we spent an extra day there. Since we had to stay on the boat the pictures are not great, but you can get an idea of how picturesque this place is.

Hadley  harbor boat house

Hadley harbor boat house

Hadley harbor horses grazing

Hadley harbor horses grazing

We left Hadley harbor Saturday morning to catch a favorable tide through the treacherous Woods Hall passage. The currents can run up 4 knots and the passage is surrounded by rocks and ledges. We made it through and again were favored with fair winds. By 11 am were were on the mooring in Edgartown on Martha’s Vineyard.

You have all seen Edgartown although you  probably didn’t know it. This is where Jaws was filmed in 1975. It is also where  Presidents and celebrities vacation. After spending a few days here it is understandable. Everything you would picture a New England vacation town of the rich and famous to be it is here including us.

Typical summer "cottage"

Typical summer “cottage”

Not as typical but unbelievable

Not as typical but unbelievable

Even places that are usually not so attractive are aesthetically pleasing. Check these out..

Edgartown Shell Station

Edgartown Shell Station

Town Jail

Town Jail- really there are bars on the window upstairs!

Hard to believe this started as a whaling town. The whalers would take go after the whales in these canoe like boats called a Dory.

Dory whaling boat

Dory whaling boat

The first night we were here we were hit with a bad storm. So glad we were on a mooring as the winds gusted to 40 mph. That is one thing about sleeping on a boat – you can often wake up in an opposite direction of where you started!

For those history buffs, remember Ted Kennedy’s ill fated car ride on  Chappaquiddick? Well, when he left Chappaquiddick he swam across the water to Edgartown. There is a ferry that runs every 5 min from Edgartown to Chappaquiddick – $12 per car and $4 per person.

Harbor water were Kennedy swam

Harbor water were Kennedy swam- see the land on the other side?

We took a short bus ride out to see the  cottages of Oak Bluff (another town here on Martha’s Vineyard). Between 1850 and 1880 the Methodists built some 500 tiny cottages (300 homes survived) around an open air tabernacle. Each cottage owner tried to outdo the others with elaborate themes and color schemes. A few examples

Oak Bluff cottage 1

Oak Bluff cottage 1

Oak Bluff Cottage 2

Oak Bluff Cottage 2

Oak Bluffs has a rich history and has been a summer place for decades of the elite African American. While elite might not describe today’s residents and guests, like Edgartown vacationing here is not for the poor.

Tomorrow we head out for Nantucket.. Until then…may we all be as Hank is…

Lucky Hanks - Best Dinner this trip!

Lucky Hanks – Best Dinner this trip!

Nautical Newport 6_18 to 6_24

It was a one day sail (ok, motor again) from Block Island to Newport, Rhode Island.  Newport is often called the gem of New England from hosting the America’s Cup to home of the summer Mansions of the ultra-rich. There is so much here to do and see the 6 six days we have been here have been filled with sightseeing and just enjoying the local harbor town feel. Coming into the harbor on the 18th we passed by one of the most well known resorts – Castle Hill. For a mere $300 you can get an 60 minute massage.

Castle Hill Resort

Castle Hill Resort

We were struck by the amount of wealth in this town. At the Newport Boatyard, Megayachts are intermingled with million dollar racing boats. The contrast between yachts purely for pleasure and multi-million dollar racing sailboats that compete all around the world and the poor fisherman who is just trying to eek out a living is striking. We met  a few crew members from one of these big yachts. They were telling us stories of the rich and famous. The most fascinating was the one where the people were so decedent and self important that they couldn’t flush there own toilets, the crew had to do it! That’s what you call a stinking job.

Megayacht in Newport

Megayacht in Newport

Racing sailboat

Racing sailboat

Yacht coming into the water after rehaul

Sailboat coming into the water after re-haul

Fishing Boat

Fishing Boat

Our entry on to Newport has been primarily by docking at an area called Bowen’s Wharf. This is a great little shopping area with water view dining. We had lunch at the highly rated 22 Bowen and can definitely agree that is worth the price. The shops are beyond our price range but window shopping is fun.

Bowen's Wharf

Bowen’s Wharf

Bowen's Wharf -interior

Bowen’s Wharf -interior

Newport is a sailor friendly town. The  Seamen’s Church Institute is available for sailors (or boaters) where they can use the internet, grab a shower, or even get a meal all at discounted prices. We are writing this blog from the Institute.

Seamen's Institue

Seamen’s Institute

Of course when visiting Newport a trip to the Mansions is a must! There are seven mansion to explore which will all built during the late 1800’s and early 1900’s by the ultra rich. We toured two of these mansion, both of which involved the Vanderbilts. The first one we toured was the Breakers. It was stunning.  The second was Marble House named for it 500,000 cubic feet of marble. They don’t allow interior photos so here are a few shots of the exterior. Still hard to believe these were the “summer cottages”.

Breaker's mansion

Breaker’s mansion

Marble Mansion

Marble Mansion

Here is shot of the Gothic room in Marble House. It is taken from a postcard so it is not all that clear, but you can get the idea of  gaudiness.

Interior Marble Mansion

Interior Marble Mansion

In case you were not aware, Newport is also where John Kennedy married Jacqueline Bouvier at St. Mary’s church.

Saint Mary's Church

Saint Mary’s Church

While we have been having a wonderful time here in Newport, we had an unfortunate accident near our boat. One of the local diver’s was working on a mooring and his equipment got tangled in the mooring line and reportedly malfunctioned causing him to drown. We couldn’t figure what the police were doing in the harbor until we learned later of the tragedy.

One other item that has been particularly interesting is the service help here. Like Block Island there are a number of young foreigners. In Block Island there was a large group from Macedonia and here there are quite a few from Ireland. They come over to work the summer season and are able to stay into late September, longer than local college students.

We leave this fantastic seaside retreat tomorrow and are heading off to Cuttyhunk, MA. Until then….

Picking out a house

House shopping!!

Newport Sunset

Newport Sunset

 

Passage and Block Island 6_15 to 6_17

Departed Atlantic City Monday morning in a misty rain and fog. It was an indication of the passage to come. Headed north and found no wind but plenty of fog. Fog – just what you want when you are crossing shipping lanes coming in and out of New York!  Given the light wind we had this passage we were thinking of renaming the blog name to Carduff motors north because that is all we were able to do. We were fortunate on two accounts on this passage. First we didn’t have any issues with ships and we got to see a pod of whales!

Fog on the passage

Fog on the passage

It took us 38 hours for this passage and we were dead tired when we got to Block Island and picked up a mooring in Salt Pond  just before the sunset on of the 16th.

The next morning it was such a delight to wake up to this adorable Island town. While Dean has been here many times this was Mindy’s first trip and she could only describe it as something you would see in a book or a movie. The island  is 9.7 square miles and is has only 1,000 full residents. It is the tourist spot for many though – those that can afford it that is. We did ask a local what they do here. He said in the summer we fish and F_ _K and in the winter we can’t fish. Now you are getting the jest of Rhode Island humor. It is the only place we have been where they want to get money from you for stepping on the island. They have a collection box as you exit the marina. Although only 50 cents we doubt anyone contributes.

Landing fee collection box

Landing fee collection box

We tried to capture in pictures the island, however the shots below do not do it justice. It truly is gorgeous.

Block Island Downtown

Block Island Downtown

Harbor Basin Block Island

Harbor Basin Block Island

3 Sisters Restaurant

3 Sisters Restaurant

While she was shopping Mindy met a store clerk who knew Bill (the guy we met in Beaufort). The beauty of a small town! We were hoping to see Bill, but we have to leave tomorrow morning. Race week is starting on Saturday here and the town is already starting to fill up. The weather looks good for tomorrow so we are going to head to Newport, RI.

Until Newport….good night….

Sunset in Block Island

Sunset in Block Island

New Jersey 6_11 to 6_14

Bright and early Thursday morning we set sail from Norfolk to Cape May, NJ. It takes about two hours to just get out of the harbor. All along the harbor are Navy ships and in front of each is a navy police boat guarding the ships 24/7. They have been on patrol since 9/11. It is hard to imagine a more tedious job than riding up and down in front of these ships for hours at a time. Don’t worry, on the slim chance someone does get by there are sailors positioned at the bow of each ship with rifles.

Anyway, the passage from Norfolk to Cape May, NJ took us 31 hours. We were able to sail part of of way, but did have to motor quite a bit too. We arrived at Cape May around 3pm on the 12th.   Since we were only going to be there overnight we opted to stay on the boat. Around 2am we got a rude awaking as a boat that had came in after we had gone to bed anchored too close was swung into us. Thank goodness no real damage was done, but we are sure he will think twice before he anchors the next time.

Another early start on Saturday the 13th. It is only 33 miles from Cape May to Atlantic City. We REALLY sailed on this passage! Our average was about 7 knots with west/southwest winds. In fact a few times we were heeling so far over that Mindy got a bit nervous. As usual, Carduff with Captain Dean at the helm did just fine. We had the anchor down in the Atlantic City harbor by 1pm.

Saturday afternoon we were hankering for a hamburger. We took the dinghy into the nearest dock which happened to be connected to the Golden nugget. In search of our burger, we went through the casino.  These people made Vegas gamblers look like movie stars. Although they could star in episodes of the walking dead!! Everyone including the dealers had that wonderful “I haven’t slept in three days look”. OMG – where do they come from? A sad representation of America. We digress…back on track. Ended up on the pier bar at Golden Nugget. Actually, it was a good burger.

Golden Nugget Pier Bar

Golden Nugget Pier Bar

Beer at the Golden Nugget

Beer at the Golden Nugget

Since Mindy had never seen the boardwalk we ventured there on Sunday. Being a fan of Boardwalk Empire it was bit distressing to see what has become of the Ritz Carlton. What would Nucky say?!?

Ritz Carlton Atlantic City

Ritz Carlton Atlantic City

There were having a bike-a-thon on the boardwalk so we got to watch a few of the riders head for the finish line.

Bike riders on the boardwalk

Bike riders on the boardwalk

How to describe the boardwalk? Not totally trashy, but definitely not classy. Remember those folks we told you about in the Casinos? They were there too. Here is another shot of the scenery.

Boardwalk Atlantic City

Boardwalk Atlantic City

It has been interesting to see how the demeanor of the people change from area to area. We got the sweet “how ya’ll” in North Carolina, the “How ya doing” in Virgina and now in Jersey “What’s up with chew”. We got on the Jitney (the bus that takes you around town) and as we handed the money to the driver he says, “This for youse too?” Gotta love it!

Thought you might me interested to see our view of Atlantic City. What do youse guys think?

Our view of Atlantic City

Our view of Atlantic City

Tomorrow we head out for Block Island, Rhode Island. It will be a challenging two day passage where we cross six shipping lanes. We will rest tonight to be alert tomorrow. So long until Block…

Mindy and Dean

Mindy and Dean

Visiting Virginia 6/7 to 6/11

We awoke bright and early on Sunday morning and headed north on the ICW to Great Bridge, VA. It is the last part of the ICW and unlike previous journeys we were  rarely alone on the waterway.  We were passed frequently by  powerboats. Their constant wake takes its toll on the ecosystem as it washes away the root system of the trees. Here is an example.

Tree on ICW with roots washed away

Tree on ICW with roots washed away

Just as we were getting to Great Bridge, VA we caught this group of boys doing some bridge jumping. We yelled up to them to jump and we’d get their picture and sure enough we did!

Kids on bridge

Kids on bridge

The bridge jump

The bridge jump

By late afternoon on Sunday we had reached Great Bridge and tied up at the public dock. Great Bridge, VA is a community in Chesapeake, VA. Its name is derived from the American Revolutionary War Battle of Great Bridge, which took place on December 9, 1775 and resulted in the final removal of British government from the Colony and Dominion of Virginia. We spent our time in Great Bridge doing a little shopping at the market located within walking distance. You learn to master the art of purchasing only those items you really need and which can fit into your backpack!

Monday morning when most of you were heading off to work we went to work on heading up the next 10 miles to Norfolk. The first stop leaving Great Bridge is to go into the lock. This was Mindy’s first experience in entering a lock. It was even more exciting because we got share the lock with this “little” barge….

Lock partner Barge

Lock partner Barge

As we were entering the harbor in Norfolk we got see a Navy ship being re-positioned by two tug boats. It was filled with service men and women and we wondered what was next for this crew.

Ship being re-positioned in Norfolk

Ship being re-positioned in Norfolk

The anchorage in Norfolk is directly across from the naval museum and a sailing club called Sail Nauticus. They must have an after work session because about 5:15 they came out to sail. It was quite a beautiful sight.

Sailboats in the harbor

Sailboats in the harbor

Tuesday morning we decided to visit the Navel museum and the USS Wisconsin. The museum was very interesting and focused quite a bit on the ports in Norfolk.  It is amazing how many products come into this port and are delivered across the country. We took a guided tour of the USS Wisconsin. Our guide was a retired Navy captain and did an outstanding job of providing details of the ship along with anecdotes about the Navy in general.

Dean in front of USS Wisconsin

Dean in front of USS Wisconsin

Tomahawk missle control center

Tomahawk missle control center

So many guns!

So many guns!

Tomorrow we head back out to sea on our way to Cape May, NJ. Until then..fair winds…..